How can I work an additional serving of vegetables into family meals?

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Answered by: Christy, An Expert in the Vegetables and Starches Category
Experts tell us we're supposed to eat 3-5 servings of fruits and vegetables a day -- but that's easier said than done.

Here's are two ideas for a tasty and healthy way to get an additional serving of vegetables onto your dinner table. Add parsnips or cauliflower to the mashed potato recipe everyone already loves.



A parsnip looks like a light-colored version of its cousin -- the carrot -- but is richer in vitamins (especially potassium) and minerals. Not only that, but it's a good source of dietary fiber and it's low in calories. Parsnips have a rich, buttery taste that is slightly sweet, like a touch of honey.

Boil half as many peeled potatoes are you usually would for dinner in lightly salted water. (Cut the potatoes into same-size chunks for the best results.) For the the other half of your recipe, use parsnips instead.



Like carrots, parsnips need to be trimmed top and bottom and peeled. Boil same-size chunks of parsnip in lightly salted water until they are tender enough to be easily pierced with a fork. Drain the parsnips, mash them up by hand or with a food processor (be careful to do this is small batches to avoid overflow). Add the mashed parsnips to mashed, drained potatoes and combine.

Season with salt and pepper to taste. If you like, add a splash of milk or half and half and a pat of butter or margarine and stir to combine.

Another healthy option -- instead of parsnips, substitute steamed or boiled and mashed cauliflower flowerets (the tops without stems) blended with a half portion of your favorite mashed potato recipe.

Cut the cauliflower tops/flowerets into same-sized pieces so they cook evenly -- when you can easily pierce with a fork, they're done. Drain and mash, then mix with potatoes and season to taste.

The texture is a bit different but the end result is tasty -- and healthy! Cauliflower is low in fat, high in fiber and a good source of vitamin C.Season with salt and pepper to taste. If you like, add a splash of milk or half and half and a pat of butter or margarine and stir to combine.

Another healthy option -- instead of parsnips, substitute steamed or boiled and mashed cauliflower flowerets (the tops without stems) blended with a half portion of your favorite mashed potato recipe.

Again, cut the cauliflower tops/flowerets into same-sized pieces so they cook evenly -- when you can easily pierce with a fork, they're done. Drain and mash, then mix with potatoes and season to taste.

The texture is a bit different but the end result is tasty -- and healthy! Cauliflower is low in fat, high in fiber and a good source of vitamin C.

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